Horror! the Monster! Horror! El marido!

No, don’t laugh, I am trying to be serious. Once it has turned “summer” here in Central Europe, meaning hot and humid and pending thunderstorms or even drought-like weather conditions, everybody starts moaning and groaning about the high temperatures, which often entail the growth of hookworms in the local lakes.

2018 dragon.jpg

Now, how about imagining a giant worm, a Lindwurm, a kind of greenish Nessie rising high out of your nearest lake, like Loch Ness? I often get the feeling that people like to exaggerate the temperatures and the dryness or the dampness, whichever. I also often think that each giant Lindwurm sums up a lot of anxious feelings people have  about their future and / or their environment. The big green worm encompassing all kinds of hidden feelings, being grumpy at work, being grouchy to friends and enemies alike, “green behind the ears” , a “greenhorn” when it comes to experiences that weren’t too agreeable,  like a wasp sting here or worms in the box shrubs now. Only they are not quite as awful as the locusts that plagued the Egyptians back in the Old Testament.

The Lindworm (cognate with Old Norse linnormr ‘ensnaring snake’, Norwegian linnorm ‘dragon’, Swedish lindorm, Danish lindorm ‘serpent’, German Lindwurm ‘dragon’) is either a dragon or serpent monster. In British heraldry, lindworm is a technical term for a wingless serpentine monster with two clawed arms in the upper body. In Norwegian heraldry a lindorm is the same as the wyvern in British heraldry. (source : Wikipedia https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lindworm)

20180627_0sean dragon merlin.jpg

Maybe we should consider the Scottish thistle as the better symbol of our summer stings, the thistle being thorny on the outside, but soft and edible on the inside with a lovely purplish color to boot, a delicacy for donkeys:

In 1503, the marriage of King James IV of Scotland to Princess Margaret Tudor of England, seems to have been the inspiration behind the poem entitled ‘The Thrissil and The Rois’ (‘The Thistle and The Rose’) penned by the Scottish poet William Dunbar. The thistle represented King James and the rose represented Princess Margaret.

Toward the middle of the same century, historians believe that Scotlands’ highest chivalric order was founded by King James V (son of King James IV), it’s name was ‘The Order of The Thistle’. It’s heraldic symbol was, not surprisingly, the humble thistle…..Heraldic symbol of the Scottish' Order of the Thistle'. Public domain image, attributed toWenceslaus Hollar [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

Image Attribution: Wenceslaus Hollar (Public domain), via Wikimedia Commons

The official motto of this organization is‘Nemo me impune lacessit’, this Latin translates into ‘No one provokes me with impunity’  (or in Scottish-English ‘ Wha daur meddle wi’ me?’ ) which ties in perfectly with the original legend. (source: https://www.scottish-at-heart.com/scottish-thistle.html)

Whichever symbol you are in favor of, just remember, there is no need to make a mountain out of a molehill, so think like Merlin the Magician and use your head, forget about monsters and enjoy the flowers while they bloom. 20180611_114937.jpg

 

Author: Djinn

"To those of us with real understanding, dancing is the only true art form" (Charles Schulz)

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